VYTAUTE TRIJONYTE
 HOMO (SOVIETICUS) 
In her work, Vytautė Trijonytė examines individual and collective memory revolving around cultural identity. She was born and grew up in Kaunas in Lithuania. Growing up in suburbia formed her initial close and intimate relationship with nature which resembles in her practice.
 
Studying and living abroad gave her an opportunity to reflect on past histories and memories in a new perspective. She was born and grew up after the collapse of the communist regime but still maintained the interest in consequences of historical events and social politics. That became a part of her curiosity and exploration in photography.

My work does not seek to explain and tell you the truth. It wants to construct and play with your mind and perception. It balances between documentary and fiction. My practice investigates social politics, history and memory, constructing narratives based on the experiential, the real and the imaginary. I am interested in how land relates to social and political history. The imagery seeks to show the sense of existing and a connection with the land, which has been affected by past histories. The landscape becomes a testament to our existence and the image of the author itself. The relationship between a human figure and space forms the basis of conceptualising my subject matter. Combining all elements together I create multi-layered narratives that become photographs.

 

My work is situated in Lithuania and explores notions of individual and collective memory and representations of personal and cultural identity. I am interested in how the land relates to social and political history. The relationship between a person and a space forms the basis of conceptualising my subject matter. Through working collaboratively with my father in a series of documented performances, the work is looking at the experiential, the real and the imaginary.

 

The imagery seeks to show the sense of belonging and a connection with the land, which has been affected by past histories of communism and political ideologies. The landscape becomes testament to our existence and actions. The piece of land that we stand on is bounded with us.

IN CONVERSATION WITH  |   2020